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Italian Tripoli

Tripoli was the capital of Italian Libya in the first half of the 20th entury. Italian Tripoli was under Italian control from 1911 until January 1943: officially it disappeared in 1947 after the Peace Treaty following WWII. It was called "Tripoli ...

                                               

Mafia

The Mafia is a crime group working in many parts of the world that was created in Italy more than 200 years ago. The mafia makes money from crime. They make billions of dollars a year from such crimes as making and selling illegal drugs, money la ...

                                               

National Memorial Day of the Exiles and Foibe

National Memorial Day of the Exiles and Foibe is Italian celebration in memory of ethnic cleansings victims in massacres of Foibe and exiles from Dalmatia, Istria and "Venezia Giulia".

                                               

Piccola Roma

The city of Asmara was founded by the Italians in the last years of the XIX century, from a small native village. Soon was made the capital of their colonial possessions in Eritrea, mainly because of the climate being located at more than 2000 me ...

                                               

Quattrocento

Quattrocento is the Italian term that means "four hundred" for the years belonging to the fifteenth century. It was one of the most important periods of European art and culture. It started in Italy and it is the first phase of the movement known ...

                                               

Spalato (Italian province)

The Italian Province of Spalato was an administrative section of the "Governorate of Dalmatia", created during World War II by the Italian government with Regio Decreto Legge of May 18, 1941.

                                               

Sperlinga

Sperlinga is a comune in the province of Enna, in the central part of Sicily. Sperlinga is about 750 m above sea level. It is on a hill on the southern slopes of the Nebrodi mountains, about 47 km north of Enna. It has a number of dwellings. The ...

                                               

Trecento

The Trecento is considered the beginning of the Italian Renaissance cultural movement. It is sometimes called Proto-Renaissance. One of the most important centres of art and architecture in this period is Florence, a political, economical and cul ...

                                               

Venice

Venice is a city in Italy. It is the capital of the Veneto region, which is in the north-east of the country. The population of the Comune di Venezia, which is Venice, its lagoon and its mainland is 271.367. Area is 412 km². The population of Ven ...

                                               

Venice and Dalmatia

Venice influenced Dalmatia commercially since the times of Charlemagne. But only at the end of the first millennium the Republic of Venice started to conquest Dalmatia. Indeed, after the fall of the Western Roman Empire, Illyrian towns on the dal ...

                                               

Zara (Italian province)

The Italian Province of Spalato was an administrative section of the Governorate of Dalmatia. It was created during World War II by the Italian government with Regio Decreto Legge of May 18, 1941.

                                               

Juan de Esquivel

Juan de Esquivel was a Spanish soldier and colonial administrator. He conquered and governed the island of Jamaica for Spain. He was born in Seville, Spain, about 1480. He came with Nicolas de Ovando to America, to the Hispaniola island, in 1502. ...

                                               

History of Japan

The History of Japan in written form dates from the 1st century, but archeologists have found proof of people living in Japan for the last several thousand years from the time when the last Ice Age ended.

                                               

Ashigaru

Ashigaru is a type of Japanese soldier that began during the Heian Period. Their origin is serving as bodyguards to government officials during this period. They became more active over hundreds of years and ended up serving as foot-soldiers for ...

                                               

Ashikaga shogunate

The Ashikaga shogunate, also known as the Muromachi shogunate, was a feudal Japanese feudal military government. The heads of government were the shoguns. Each was a member of the Ashikaga clan. These years are known as the Muromachi period. The ...

                                               

Bushido

Bushidō, meaning "Way of the Warrior", is a Japanese code of conduct and a way of life, more or less similar to the European code of chivalry. It comes from the samurai moral code and gives great importance to certain virtues like frugality, loya ...

                                               

Circuit (political division)

A circuit was an historical political division of Tang China and Japan and Korea. In Korean, the same word 道 is translated as "province".

                                               

Daimyo

The daimyo were powerful feudal rulers from the 10th century to the early 19th century in Japan. Each daimyo had control over a part of the country. The Shogun had power over the daimyo.

                                               

Empire of Japan

The Empire of Japan was a government of the areas ruled by Japan during the period from the Meiji Restoration to the Japanese defeat in World War II. The Emperors during this time, were Emperor Meiji, Emperor Taishō and Emperor Shōwa. It is consi ...

                                               

List of the 53 Stations of the Tōkaidō

The List of the 53 Stations of the Tōkaidō covers the rest areas along the Tōkaidō, which was a coastal route that ran from Edo to Kyoto.

                                               

Gukanshō

Gukanshō is a Japanese historical and literary work about the history of the country. The work was written around 1220 by a Buddhist priest. The authors name was Jien. In Gukanshō, Jien created a chronicle of the lives of the emperors. Jien wrote ...

                                               

Imperial Household Agency

The Imperial Household Agency is a government agency of Japan. This bureaucracy is concerned with Imperial House of Japan. Kunaichō keeps the Privy Seal of Japan and the State Seal of Japan. In the 18 centuries before the Second World War, it was ...

                                               

Insei

Insei, also known as cloistered rule," is an ancient Japanese term which means a special form of Imperial government. In the Insei system, the monarch abdicated or retired and a new emperor was named; however, the old emperor held on to significa ...

                                               

Kamakura shogunate

The Kamakura shogunate was a feudal Japanese feudal military government. The heads of government were the shoguns. The first three were members of the Minamoto clan. The next two were members of the Fujiwara clan. The last six were minor Imperial ...

                                               

Kamikaze

Kamikaze is a word of Japanese origin. It comes from the name the Japanese gave to a typhoon that destroyed the Mongol ships in the 13th century and saved the country from invasion. In Western culture, the word kamikaze is used to mean the suicid ...

                                               

Kofun

Kofun are earthen tombs or tumuli in Japan. They were constructed between the early 3rd century and early 7th century. These burial mounds are referenced in the name of the Kofun period middle 3rd century - early-middle 6th century. Many of the k ...

                                               

Meiji Restoration

The Meiji Restoration was a time of great change in Japan. In the Japanese language, Meiji-ishin is the term for the Meiji Restoration. The term describes a series of events that changed the shape of Japan’s political and social systems. These ch ...

                                               

Battle of Nagashino

The Battle of Nagashino was an armed conflict in 1575. The battle took place near Nagashino Castle on the plain of Shitaragahara in the Mikawa province of Japan.

                                               

Nihon kōki

Nihon kōki is an ancient history of Japan written in 843. This work is the third of the Rikkokushi "Six National Histories". It was written after the Nihon Shoki and the Shoku Nihongi. Fujiwara no Otsugu, Fujiwara no Yoshino, Fujiwara no Yoshifus ...

                                               

Nihon Odai Ichiran

Nihon Odai Ichiran is a Japanese book. It is a 17th century chronicle of the reigns of the Japanese emperors before the 19th century. A French translation of Nihon Ōdai Ichiran Annales des empereurs du Japon was published in 1834. It was translat ...

                                               

Nuclear accidents in Japan

Nuclear accidents in Japan include the following major cases: The fast breeder Monju Nuclear Power Plant sodium leak in December 1995 the reactor is still shut-down, the Tokai reprocessing waste explosion in March 1997, the criticality accident a ...

                                               

Rikkokushi

Rikkokushi, also romanized Rokkokushi, is a general term for Japans six earliest national histories. These six books chronicle the mythology and history of Japan from the earliest times to AD 887.

                                               

Shinsengumi

Shinsengumi was a military police force in Japan in the Edo era. Shinsengumi was organized by Katamori Matsudaira. He was an Aizu feudal lord. They were gathered to defend Kyoto against political opponents. Shinsengumi became famous by the Ikeday ...

                                               

Shogun

Shogun is a military title in pre-Meiji period Japan. Shogun means general in the Japanese language. The full name was Seii Taishogun. In the earlier times, Shogun were simply generals for emperors. The emperor had power over the shogun, choosing ...

                                               

Shoku Nihongi

Shoku Nihongi is an ancient history of Japan written in 797. This work is the second of the Rikkokushi "Six National Histories". It was written after the Nihon Shoki and before the Nihon Kōki. Sugeno Mamichi was the main editor. Shoku Nihongi is ...

                                               

Takobeya labour

Takobeya labour was a Japanese form of work. It was a harsh system started in Hokkaido during the Meiji period. It replaced Penal labour in Hokkaido. The workers slept in accommodation huts at construction sites. The concentration huts were calle ...

                                               

The Tale of the Heike

The Tale of the Heike is an epic account of the struggle between two rival clans at the end of the 12th century. In the title of this work, the Heike is one of several ways to describe the Taira clan. This conflict is also known in the Genpei War ...

                                               

Testament of Ieyasu

A translation of Ieyasus words is: "Life is like walking along a long road shouldering a heavy load; there is no need to hurry. One who treats difficulties as the normal state of affairs will never be discontented. Patience is the source of etern ...

                                               

Tokugawa shogunate

The Tokugawa shogunate, also known as the Tokugawa bakufu, and the Edo bakufu, was a feudal Japanese military government. The heads of government were the shoguns. Each was a member of the Tokugawa clan. These years are known as the Edo period. T ...

                                               

COVID-19 pandemic in Jordan

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic spread to Jordan on 2 March 2020, when the Ministry of Health confirmed the first case in the kingdom. As of May 2, Jordan had 460 confirmed cases, with 367 recovered and 9 deaths.

                                               

2020 Beirut explosion

On 4 August 2020, an explosion happened in the city of Beirut, the capital of Lebanon. The blast happened at the Port of Beirut and left at least 215 people dead with the total expected to go higher, at least 7.500 injured, and many more missing. ...

                                               

COVID-19 pandemic in Lebanon

On 21 February 2020, Lebanon confirmed its first case of COVID-19: a 45-year-old woman traveling back from Qom, Iran tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 and was transferred to a hospital in Beirut. On 26 February, a second woman, who returned from Ira ...

                                               

2012 Benghazi attack

The 2012 Benghazi attack took place on the evening of September 11, 2012. Islamic militants attacked the United States consulate in Benghazi, Libya. Killed in the attack were US Ambassador Christopher Stevens and Sean Smith a US diplomat. Stevens ...

                                               

Korean Air Flight 803

On 27 July 1989, a Korean Air DC-10 crashed while attempting to land in Tripoli, Libya. 75 of the 199 passengers and crew on board plus 4 persons on the ground were killed in the crash.

                                               

Libyan Civil War (2011)

The Libyan Civil War was a civil war in Libya during the year 2011. It began in the middle of February 2011. Many Libyans were inspired by the uprisings in neighbouring countries, such as Tunisia and Egypt. They violently protested against the go ...

                                               

Third International Theory

The Third International Theory, also known as the Third Universal Theory, was the style of government proposed by Muammar Gaddafi in the early 1970s, on which his government, the Great Socialist Peoples Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, was officially base ...

                                               

2012 U.S. diplomatic missions attacks

On September 11, 2012, the U.S. embassies in Cairo, Egypt; Chennai, India; Tunis, Tunisia; Khartoum, Sudan; Sanaa, Yemen, and the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya were attacked.

                                               

Einsatzgruppen

Einsatzgruppen were a paramilitary group in Nazi Germany. They were part of the Schutzstaffel. They helped make The Holocaust happen by murdering about 12 million people throughout Europe. Almost all of the people they killed were civilians. Some ...

                                               

Polish-Lithuanian Union

The term Polish-Lithuanian union means a development from personal union between the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania to the creation of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth - the "Republic of the Two Nations" - in 1569 and eventu ...

                                               

History of Vilnius

Historians tend to identify the city with Voruta, a legendary capital of Mindaugas who was crowned in 1253 as King of Lithuania. The city was first mentioned in written sources in 1323, in letters of Grand Duke Gediminas that were sent to German ...