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Edward Heffron

Edward James Heffron was a former American World War II-veteran. Heffron was played in the HBO miniseries Band of Brothers by Robin Laing. He wrote some books about his view of the war. Heffron was born in South Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on May ...

                                               

John Francis Jackson

John Francis Jackson, DFC was an Australian fighter ace and squadron commander of World War II. He had eight aerial victories, and led No. 75 Squadron during the Battle of Port Moresby in 1942. Born in Brisbane, he was a grazier and businessman. ...

                                               

Leopold III of Belgium

Leopold III was King of the Belgians from 1934 until 1951. He left the throne and his son Baudouin became King. Leopold III went to the throne of Belgium on 23 February 1934 following the death of his father, King Albert I.

                                               

Benito Mussolini

Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini KSMOM GCTE was an Italian politician and journalist. He was also the Prime Minister of Italy from 1922 until 1943. He was the leader of the National Fascist Party.

                                               

Joseph Serchuk

Joseph Serchuk was the commander of the Jewish partisan unit in the Lublin area in Poland during the Holocaust. After the war, he testified at trials of Nazis and he received special recognition from the State of Israel.

                                               

Raoul Wallenberg

Raoul Wallenberg was a Swedish businessman and diplomat. He helped save about 100.000 Hungarian Jews from being killed by the Nazis in 1944, during the Holocaust in World War II. He often risked his life, and later won worldwide admiration for hi ...

                                               

Refugee

In 1951, the United Nations law called Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, said a refugee was a person who is forced to leave their country due to natural disasters or war and conflict owing to a well-founded fear of being persecuted f ...

                                               

Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge

Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge is a US National Wildlife Refuge located in the southern part of San Francisco Bay, California. The Refuge headquarters and visitor center is located in the Baylands district of Fremont, next ...

                                               

Julia Gardiner Tyler

Julia Gardiner Tyler was the second wife of John Tyler, the tenth President of the United States. She was the First Lady of the United States from June 26, 1844 to March 4, 1845. Her parents were Juliana McLachlan and David Gardiner. Her parents ...

                                               

Curzon family

House of Curzon, which dates back to the 1200s, is one of the most acknowledged English aristocratic families. Its family members have held almost 14 hereditary titles, including Earl Howe, Marquess Curzon of Kedleston, Earl Curzon of Kedleston, ...

                                               

Grand duchy

A grand duchy is a country whose head of state is a Grand Duke or Grand Duchess. The only grand duchy in existence today is Luxembourg. Luxembourg became a grand duchy in 1815 when the Netherlands became an independent kingdom, and King William I ...

                                               

Heir apparent

An heir is a person who has inherited something after the original owners death. Most often a child after his or her parents death. Heir apparent and heir presumptive usually refer to someone who will inherit a royal or noble title: An heir appar ...

                                               

Lord

A Lord is a person who has power and authority. Women will usually take the title Lady instead of Laird or Lord, but there is an example of a female Lord: Lord of Mann, the ruler of the Isle of Man. The territory belonging to a lord is often call ...

                                               

Luis of Spain, Count of Chinchon

Infante Luis Antonio Jaime of Spain and was known as the Cardinal-Infante. He was also then last child of Philip V of Spain and his wife Elisabeth Farnese. He is famous for being the youngest Cardinal in history. He also had close ties with sever ...

                                               

Marquess

Marquess is a title of nobility in many countries in Europe. It is a rank higher than an earl but lower than a duke. Marquis is correct in France, and Margrave in Germany for a local ruler. This title was usually granted by a monarch to reward a ...

                                               

Pretender

A pretender is someone who says that he or she has the right to be ruler. The word is often used to describe someone who claims that they have the right to be king, queen, emperor etc. They claim that the ruler who is on the throne should not be ...

                                               

Reign

A reign is the period of time that a monarch rules over a country. It can also be the period of time that a spiritual leader rules in a particular office. For example, the reign of a pope, dalai lama, patriarch etc. A reign can also be used for a ...

                                               

Roper family

House of Roper is one of the most notable English aristocratic families, which can be traced back to the year 1066 after the Norman Conquest, they resided in Derbyshire, and their family members have held hereditary titles such as Baron of Teynha ...

                                               

Titles of European royal heirs

Many past and present European monarchies have reserved titles used just by the heir apparent to the throne. The famous example of this is Charles, Prince of Wales, heir to the British throne. Many heir have had" crown prince” as their title.

                                               

Tsarevich of Russia

The title of Tsarevich of Russia was traditionally used by the heir apparent or heir presumptive in the Russian Empire. The title was used with the style Imperial Highness. The title was usually only used by males due to females being prevented f ...

                                               

Aesop

Aesop, or Æsop, is known for his fables. He was, by tradition, a slave of African descent who lived from about 620 BC to 560 BC in Ancient Greece. Aesops Fables are still taught as moral lessons and used as subjects for entertainment, especially ...

                                               

John Caesar

John Caesar, known as Black Caesar, was the first Australian bushranger. He was also the first black person with an African background to come to Australia. He was the first bushranger to have a reward offered for his capture.

                                               

Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass was an African-American in the 19th century. He was born as a slave in Maryland, but learned to read and escaped to the North in the 1830s. He soon became an abolitionist someone who wants to end slavery, and worked with other ...

                                               

James B. Dudley

James Benson Dudley was President of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University from 1896 until his death in 1925. James B. Dudley High School in the town of Greensboro, North Carolina, where the Agricultural and Technical Univers ...

                                               

Harriet Jacobs

Harriet Jacobs was an African American in the 19th century. She was born as a slave in North Carolina, but learned to read and escaped to the North in the 1842. When she was still a girl, her master wanted to start a sexual relationship with her. ...

                                               

Margaret Palm

Margaret Palm was an African-American woman. She lived in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania with her husband and son during the middle nineteenth century. She was a "conductor" on the Underground Railroad. She was called "Maggie Bluecoat" for the blue mil ...

                                               

Saint Patrick

Saint Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland. He was born in a village in Roman Britain. Saint Patrick came from a Christian family. He was the son of Calpornius, who was a deacon. According to the autobiographical Confessio of Patrick, when he w ...

                                               

Ignatius Sancho

Ignatius Sancho was an African born around 1729 on a slave ship. Towards the end of his extraordinary life, he became a British citizen and was eligible to vote in the parliamentary election of 1774, and then again in 1780. The details of his ear ...

                                               

Tituba

Tituba was a slave in Salem Village during the Salem Witch Trials of 1692. She was the first to be accused of witchcraft and the first to confess. This confession was obtained after she was beaten by her master. She accused others, setting off th ...

                                               

Sojourner Truth

Sojourner Truth was one of the first abolitionists and activists for womens rights. She was born as a slave, but escaped from slavery in 1826. She was born Isabella Baumfree, but renamed herself to Sojourner Truth when she was 46 and announced sh ...

                                               

Nat Turner

Nathaniel "Nat" Turner was an American slave and Christian preacher. He believed God gave him visions. When he was 21 years old, Nat Turner escaped from his master Samuel Turner following in his fathers footsteps and hid in the woods. 30 days lat ...

                                               

Booker T. Washington

Booker Taliaferro Washington was an American political leader, teacher and author. He was born into slavery, but was eventually freed. He was one of the most important people in African American history in the United States from 1890 to 1915. Was ...

                                               

Get Rich or Die Tryin

Get Rich or Die Tryin is the debut studio album of American rapper 50 Cent. It was released on February 4, 2003, by Aftermath Entertainment and Shady Records.

                                               

John Adams

John Adams, Jr. was the second President of the United States, and father of the sixth President, John Quincy Adams. He was also the first Vice President of the United States. Adams was born in Braintree, Massachusetts. He was the son of Lt. Col. ...

                                               

Abigail Adams

Abigail Smith Adams was the wife of John Adams, the second President of the United States. Later on, people started to address the wife of the president as the First Lady. So, she became the second First Lady of the United States. She was born in ...

                                               

Alien and Sedition Acts

The Alien and Sedition Acts were acts of Congress signed by United States president John Adams in 1798, during a naval conflict against France. There were four acts. The first three acts were about immigration. They set required time for an immig ...

                                               

John Quincy Adams

John Quincy Adams was the sixth President of the United States. He was the first President who was a son of a President. Also, Adams was the first president to be photographed, instead of painted. Adams was a Federalist and served in the administ ...

                                               

Louisa Adams

Louisa Catherine Johnson Adams was the wife of US President John Quincy Adams. As the wife of the US President, she was the First Lady of the United States from 1825 to 1829. She was born in London. Her mother, Catherine Nuth Johnson was an Engli ...

                                               

Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou was an American poet, author, writer, memoirist, and civil rights activist. She published seven autobiographies, three books of essays, several books of poetry, and was credited with a list of plays, films, and television shows spann ...

                                               

Archimedes

Archimedes of Syracuse was a Greek scientist. He was an inventor, an astronomer, and a mathematician. He was born in the town of Syracuse in Sicily. His father was Phidias, an astronomer, and he may have been in the family of a king of Syracuse. ...

                                               

Archimedean solid

In geometry, an Archimedean solid is a convex shape which is composed of polygons. It is a polyhedron, with the following properties: The shape is neither a platonic solid, nor a prism, nor an antiprism. All the corners of the shape look the same ...

                                               

Archimedes number

The Archimedes number is named after the Greek Archimedes. In viscous fluid dynamics, the Archimedes number Ar is used when the motion of fluids is affected by density differences. It is a dimensionless number, the ratio of gravitational forces t ...

                                               

Archimedes principle

Archimedes principle is named after Archimedes of Syracuse, the first to discover this law. When he did, he ran naked out of his bathtub. Archimedes principle relates buoyancy to displacement.

                                               

Chester A. Arthur

Chester Alan Arthur was an American politician and the 21st President of the United States. Before becoming president, he was most noted as the Collector of Customs for the port of New York, a job he got from his political friendships. Arthur was ...

                                               

Mary McElroy

Mary Arthur McElroy was the sister of the 21st President of the United States, Chester A. Arthur, and served as a hostess for his administration. She assumed the role because Arthurs wife, Ellen Lewis Herndon Arthur, had died only a year and a ha ...

                                               

Isaac Asimov

Asimov was born in Petrovichi, Smolensk Oblast, Russian SFSR to a Jewish family, on an unknown date between October 4, 1919 and January 2, 1920. Asimov celebrated his birthday on January 2. He was taken to the United States when he was three, and ...

                                               

Foundation series

Foundation was originally a series of eight short stories published in Astounding Magazine between May 1942 and January 1950. According to Asimov, the premise was based on ideas set forth in Edward Gibbons The History of the Decline and Fall of t ...

                                               

I, Robot

I, Robot is a collection of nine science fiction short stories by Isaac Asimov. The stories originally appeared in the American magazines Super Science Stories and Astounding Science Fiction between 1940 and 1950 and were compiled into a book in ...

                                               

The Naked Sun

The Naked Sun is a science fiction mystery novel written by Isaac Asimov. It is about a human detective named Elijah Baley who goes to another planet called Solaria and has to try and solve a murder with the help of a robot named Daneel Olivaw. T ...

                                               

The Rest of the Robots

The Rest of the Robots is a collection of eight short stories and two full-length novels by Isaac Asimov. The stories are all part of the Robot series, and follow on from ʽI, Robot. The novels were not included in some published versions. The sto ...