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Fairy tale

A fairy tale is an English language expression for a kind of short story. It has the same meaning as the French expression conte de fee or Conte merveilleux, the German word Marchen, the Italian fiaba, the Polish basn, the Russian сказка or the S ...

                                               

Beauty and the Beast

Beauty and the Beast is a French folk story. It tells the story of a merchant who is lost in the woods. He finds the palace of a beast who wants to kill him, and makes a deal with the beast, to have his daughter in exchange. The daughter goes to ...

                                               

Bluebeard

Bluebeard is a fairy tale by Charles Perrault. It first appeared in a handwritten and illustrated manuscript in 1695 titled Contes de ma mere loye. The deluxe volume was intended for Mademoiselle, the 19-year-old niece of Louis XIV. It included f ...

                                               

Cinderella

Cinderella, or The Little Glass Slipper is a fairy tale by Charles Perrault. It was first published anonymously in Paris in 1697 in Histoires ou contes du temps passe, a collection of eight fairy tales by Perrault. The story is about an ill-treat ...

                                               

Diamonds and Toads

Diamonds and Toads is a fairy tale by Charles Perrault. It first appeared in a handwritten and illustrated manuscript in 1695 called Contes de ma mêre loye. The volume was intended for the kings niece, and included four other tales by Perrault. I ...

                                               

The Emperors New Clothes

The Emperors New Clothes is a story by Hans Christian Andersen. The tale was first published on 7 April 1837 with "The Little Mermaid" in the third and final installment of Andersens Fairy Tales Told for Children. It was published in Copenhagen, ...

                                               

Fable

A fable is a type of story which shows something in life or has a meaning to a word. A fable teaches a lesson or suggests a moral from it. A fable starts in the middle of the story, that means, jumps into the main event without detailed introduct ...

                                               

Gingerbread Man (fairy tale)

The Gingerbread Man is an American fairy tale. It is a variant of the European runaway pancake story. The American version first appeared in the May 1875 issue of St. Nicholas Magazine. The story tells of a Gingerbread Man who runs away from the ...

                                               

The Little Match Girl

The Little Match Girl is a story by Hans Christian Andersen. It was first published in December 1845. Andersen got the idea to write the story after seeing a print by Johan Thomas Lundbye of a little girl selling matches. The story has been adapt ...

                                               

The Little Mermaid

The Little Mermaid is a literary fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen. It was first published in Copenhagen, Denmark in 1837 in the third volume of Fairy Tales Told for Children with "The Emperors New Clothes". The tale glorifies suffering and s ...

                                               

The Lost Wand

The Lost Wand is a fairy tale written by Jean Ingelow and published by The Wonder Box Tales in 1902 The story revolves around Hulda, a lucky young girl in Norway who receives the opportunity to be granted a wish after finding a ring in her slice ...

                                               

Momotarō

Momotarō is a popular hero from Japanese folklore. His name literally means Peach Tarō. Because Tarō is a common Japanese boys name, it is usually translated as Peach Boy. Momotarō is also the name of several books, films, and other works that te ...

                                               

The Nightingale (Andersen)

The Nightingale is a literary fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen. It was published in 1844 in Andersens New Fairy Tales with "The Angel", "The Sweethearts", and "The Ugly Duckling". The critics liked these stories. Andersens inspiration for "T ...

                                               

One-inch boy

The one-inch boy, or Issun-bōshi, is a character in a Japanese fairy tale. The story begins with an old, childless couple who live alone. The old woman wishes for a child, even though shes old. Eventually, a son was born to them, but their son wa ...

                                               

Pentamerone

The Pentamerone or Lo cunto de li cunti overo lo trattenemiento de peccerille is a seventeenth-century collection of fairy tales by Giambattista Basile. The collection consists of a frame story and 49 fairy tales. Ten old women tell the tales ove ...

                                               

The Princess and the Pea

The Princess and the Pea is a literary fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen. It was first published in Copenhagen, Denmark in 1835. It appeared as the third tale in the first book of Andersens Fairy Tales Told for Children. The other tales in th ...

                                               

Puss in Boots

Puss in Boots is a fairy tale. It was written/recorded by Charles Perrault. The story is the classic "animal as helper" tale. It is about a cat who uses tricks and lies to gain power, money, and a princess in marriage for his lowborn master. The ...

                                               

Rickey with the Tuft

Rickey with the Tuft or Riquet with the Tuft is a fairy tale by Charles Perrault. It was first published in Paris in 1697 by Claude Barbin in Histoires ou contes du temps passe, a collection of eight fairy tales by Perrault. The story is about an ...

                                               

The Snow Queen

The Snow Queen is a literary fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen. It was first published 21 December 1844 with "The Fir Tree" in New Fairy Tales. It is one of Andersens longest stories and is divided into seven chapters. It tells the story of a ...

                                               

The Steadfast Tin Soldier

The Steadfast Tin Soldier is a literary fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen. The story was first published in Copenhagen, Denmark by C.A. Reitzel on 2 October 1838 in the first booklet of Fairy Tales Told for Children. The booklet includes Ande ...

                                               

The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales

The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales is a childrens book by Jon Scieszka. It was published in 1992 by Viking. It is a collection of stories which make fun of famous childrens stories and fairy tales, such as "Chicken Licken", "The ...

                                               

Stories or Tales of Past Times

Stories or Tales from Past Times is a collection of eight fairy tales by Charles Perrault. It was published in Paris in 1697 by Claude Barbin. The collection is also known as Mother Gooses Tales. The eight tales are "The Sleeping Beauty in the Wo ...

                                               

The Story of the Three Bears

The Story of the Three Bears is a literary fairy tale. It was written by Robert Southey and first published in 1837 in a collection of his essays and stories. Southeys story is about an ugly old woman who enters the house of three bachelor bears ...

                                               

Sun, Moon, and Talia

Sun, Moon, and Talia is a fairy tale by Giambattista Basile. It was published in his Pentamerone. It is similar to the "Sleeping Beauty" tales by Charles Perrault and the Brothers Grimm.

                                               

The Swineherd

"The Swineherd" is a literary fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen. It was first published 20 December 1841 by C. A. Reitzel in Copenhagen, Denmark in Fairy Tales Told for Children. The fairy tale appears to be original with Andersen though simi ...

                                               

Three Little Pigs (1933)

The Three Little Pigs is a 1933 cartoon in the Silly Symphonies series. It is about the fairy tale of the three little pigs. The pigs make houses with different materials, and the Big Bad Wolf tries to knock them down. Three Little Pigs 1933 was ...

                                               

The Three Little Pigs

The Three Little Pigs is a fable/fairy tale featuring three pigs. They each build houses of different materials. A big bad wolf is able to blow down the first two pigs houses. The first is made of straw, the second is made of wood. But he is unab ...

                                               

Thumbelina

"Thumbelina" is a fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen. The tale was first printed by C. A. Reitzel on 16 December 1835 in Copenhagen, Denmark. "Thumbelina" is about a tiny girl. She has several adventures with a toad, a mole, a field mouse, and ...

                                               

The Tinderbox

The Tinderbox is a literary fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen. It was originally published in Copenhagen, Denmark in May 1835 in the first booklet of Fairy Tales Told for Children. The three other stories in the booklet were "Big Claus and Li ...

                                               

The Ugly Duckling

The Ugly Duckling is a literary fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen. Andersen lavished great care on this story, spending a year perfecting it. It was first published in 1844 with "The Angel", "The Sweethearts", and "The Nightingale" in New Fai ...

                                               

Amabie

Amabie is a mermaid or merman with three legs in Japanese myths. It is believed that it will emerge from the sea and make prophecies about harvest or epidemic.

                                               

Daruma doll

The Daruma doll is a hollow, round, traditional Japanese doll. It is modeled after Bodhidharma, the founder of the Zen sect of Buddhism. The Daruma dolls are a kind of toy omocha. The Daruma figurine is also a tumbler doll or roly-poly toy. When ...

                                               

Forty-seven Ronin

The revenge of the Forty-seven Ronin took place in Japan at the start of the 18th century. It describes a historical event, but there is a lot of fiction added to the story too. The story tells of a group of samurai who were left leaderless becom ...

                                               

Hanasaka Jiisan

There was a kind-hearted old man, Hanasaka-jiisan, who grew cherry blossoms. The old man and his wife had a white puppy. One day, their dog barked," Koko-hore-wan-wan,” meaning "Dig here! Bark bark!" while digging in a field. The old man dug up g ...

                                               

Hōmyō dōji

Hōmyō dōji is a story from Japanese folklore. It is about a man who has a son. The son has to be a human sacrifice to a snake. He does not get sacrificed. Another boy named Hōmyō offers to sacrifice himself instead. Hōmyōs father is dead. Hōmyō i ...

                                               

Japanese dragon

A Japanese dragon, also known as ryū or tatsu is a mythical animal from Japan. Like other creatures called dragons, the Ryū is a big, fantastic animal that looks similar to a serpent, and is related to the Chinese long and the Korean yong. Like a ...

                                               

Japanese folklore

Japanese folklore is the folklore of Japan. It is very influenced by Shinto and Buddhism, the two most important religions in the country. It usually includes humorous or strange characters and situations. It also includes many supernatural creat ...

                                               

Kappa (folklore)

The Kappa is a character in Japanese folklore. It is water spirit that is responsible for mischief. The Kappa is said to be the size of a 6 to 10 year old boy. It has the body of a tortoise and an ape-like head. The most notable thing about its b ...

                                               

Namahage

One of the strangest events takes place around Akita. It is called Namahage. Namahage is a traditional culture in Akita prefecture. The main event of namahage is very terrible for children. The frightfully dressed men portray Namahage equipped wi ...

                                               

Onryō

Onryō is a Japanese ghost who is believed to be able to return to the world of the living to seek revenge. Some onryō are male, mostly in Kabuki, but most of them are women. They usually suffer at the hands of their male lovers when they were ali ...

                                               

Ryūjin

Ryūjin was the god of the sea in Japanese mythology. He was a dragon, a symbol of the power of the ocean, had a very big mouth, and could transform into human shape. Ryūjin lived in Ryūgū-jō, his palace under the sea built out of red and white co ...

                                               

Seven Lucky Gods

The Seven Gods of Fortune, commonly called the Seven Lucky Gods in English, refer to the seven gods of good fortune in Japanese mythology and folklore. They are often the subject of netsuke carvings. Each has a traditional characteristic: Daikoku ...

                                               

Tamamo-no-Mae

Tamamo-no-Mae is a legendary figure in Japanese mythology and folklore. In the Otogizoshi, a collection of Japanese prose written in the Muromachi period, Tamamo-no-Mae was a courtesan under the Japanese Emperor Konoe. She was said to be the most ...

                                               

Urashima Tarō

Urashima Tarō is a Japanese fairy tale about a fisherman who rescues a turtle and is rewarded with a visit to the Ryūgū-jō, the Dragon Palace. There are many different versions of this story.

                                               

Yōkai

Yōkai are creature in old Japanese stories, such as oni, kappa, or tengu. They have mysterious supernatural powers. There are thousands of yōkai. In the Edo period, yōkai were characters in story books. Recently, many new yōkai have been made. Th ...

                                               

Animalia Paradoxa

Animalia Paradoxa is the label given to a few species of animal, listed in Carolus Linnaeus early editions of Systema Naturae. Linne thought that these animals did not make sense. Today, such animals are usually called Cryptids. The respective se ...

                                               

Dragon

A dragon is a legendary creature, belonging to mythology and fantasy. There are stories about dragons in Chinese culture, European culture, South American culture, and many others. There are many kinds of dragons in the different cultures. In gen ...

                                               

Fairy

A fairy or færie is a supposed magical being that flies in the air. They are usually depicted as tiny girls or women. Some fairies have certain jobs, such as the Tooth fairy, who gives money or treats under the pillow of small children who have h ...

                                               

Fenrir

In Norse mythology, Fenrir, also known as Fenrisulfr, or Vanargand, is a giant, monstrous wolf, son of Loki and the giantess Angrboda, and the brother of Hel and Jormungandr. Fenrir was tied up by the gods, but was destined to break free from his ...

                                               

Imp

This article is about the mythical creature. For other uses see imp. An imp is a mythological creature similar to a fairy or demon, usually described in folklore and superstition. Imps are usually described as mischievous more than a serious thre ...

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