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Drone strike

A drone strike is an attack by one or more unmanned combat aerial vehicles or weaponized commercial unmanned aerial vehicles. It usually involves firing a missile or releasing a bomb at a target. The drone may be equipped with such weapons as gui ...

                                               

Rapier (missile)

Rapier is a British surface-to-air missile. It was developed for the British Army and Royal Air Force. It began being used in 1971 and eventually replaced all other anti-aircraft weapons in the British Army. It replaced both guns for targets that ...

                                               

Starstreak (missile)

Starstreak is a British short range surface-to-air missile. It is made by Thales Air Defence, in Belfast. It is also known as Starstreak High Velocity Missile, or Starstreak HVM. After it is launched, the missile travels at about Mach 3. Starstre ...

                                               

Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

The Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were nuclear attacks on the Empire of Japan during World War II. The United States and the Allies were fighting against Japan and slowly winning. Two nuclear weapons were dropped on Japan, one on the ...

                                               

Contesting the Future of Nuclear Power

Contesting the Future of Nuclear Power: A Critical Global Assessment of Atomic Energy is a 2011 book by Benjamin K. Sovacool, published by World Scientific. Sovacool’s book explores the global nuclear power industry, its fuel cycle, nuclear accid ...

                                               

Cuban Missile Crisis

The Cuban Missile Crisis was a time of heightened confrontation between the Soviet Union, the United States, and Cuba during the Cold War. In Russia, it is known as the Caribbean Crisis. Cuba calls it the October Crisis. It was a proxy conflict a ...

                                               

In Mortal Hands

In Mortal Hands: A Cautionary History of the Nuclear Age is a 2009 book by Stephanie Cooke. The book says that nuclear energy failed to develop in the way its planners hoped, and explores the military and civilian sides of nuclear energy. In the ...

                                               

International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons

The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons is a global civil society group working to support and promote the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. ICAN was launched in 2007 and counts 541 partner organizations in 103 countries ...

                                               

Launch on warning

Launch on warning is a strategy of using nuclear weapons that gained recognition during the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union. Launch on warning became an important part of mutually assured destruction theory as a result of ...

                                               

Manhattan Project

The Manhattan Project was the program based in the United States which tried to make the first nuclear weapons. The project went on during World War II, and was run by the U.S. Army. The head of the project was General Leslie R. Groves, who had l ...

                                               

Mutual assured destruction

Mutual assured destruction is a military strategy in which two opposing military forces are powerful enough to completely destroy each other. It should help to avoid a nuclear war. This usually happens when both forces have nuclear weapons. If a ...

                                               

Nevada Test Site

The Nevada Test Site is an area set aside for the testing of nuclear weapons. It is looked after by the United States Department of Energy. It is in Nye County, Nevada, about 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The site was begun on January 11, 1951 ...

                                               

Nuclear espionage

Nuclear espionage is sharing a countrys secrets about nuclear weapons to other countries without permission. Since nuclear weapons have been invented, there have been many cases of known nuclear espionage, and also many cases where it has thought ...

                                               

Nuclear explosion

A nuclear explosion is energy being released from a very fast nuclear reaction. It can be caused by nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, or both. Atmospheric nuclear explosions are associated with mushroom clouds, although mushroom clouds can occur a ...

                                               

Nuclear fallout

Fallout is the left over radiation hazard from a nuclear explosion. The name is because radioactive material "falls out" of the atmosphere into which it is spread during the explosion. These materials continue to undergo radioactive decay for min ...

                                               

Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty

The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is a treaty that was made to stop nuclear weapons from being built. It was written in 1968, entered into force in 1970, and 190 countries have signed it since then. Only four nations have not signed it: India, ...

                                               

Nuclear proliferation

Nuclear proliferation is when a country starts making nuclear objects. On the right is a map showing who has nuclear reactors and weapons, and who could have them. When a country starts making nuclear weapons, they become a nuclear power.

                                               

Nuclear weapon

A nuclear weapon, also known as a nuclear bomb or a nuke, is a weapon that suddenly releases the energy in the nucleus of certain types of atoms. When triggered, these devices release a huge amount of energy in the form of a nuclear explosion. Nu ...

                                               

Tsar Bomba

Tsar Bomba, the nickname for the AN602 H-bomb, was the largest, most powerful nuclear weapon ever used. It was originally tested by the Soviet Union on October 30, 1961. It was a three stage H-bomb. This bomb is also called the Father of Bombs. T ...

                                               

Warship

A warship is a ship carrying weapons, which is used by the navy. Some warships also carry naval aircraft. Warships are made in many different sizes. Here is a list of different kinds of warships, from the largest to the smallest of World War II:

                                               

Aircraft carrier

Aircraft carriers are warships that carry airplanes and other aircraft like helicopters. They are used by navies to allow aircraft to fight along with naval warships. Aircraft carriers are usually very large, carrying hundreds or thousands of sai ...

                                               

Battleship

A battleship is a large armored warship with a main battery consisting of heavy caliber guns. Battleships are larger, better armed and armored than cruisers and destroyers. After the old wooden sailing ship of the line became obsolete around 1870 ...

                                               

Bismarck (ship)

The German battleship Bismarck was built by Nazi Germany. It was one of the most famous and recognized warships of World War II. It sailed for just one mission, known as Operation "Rheinubung". Its construction began on 1 July 1936 in a shipyard ...

                                               

USS Buck (SP-1355)

The first USS Buck was later renamed to USS SP-1355. It was a tender that served in the United States Navy from 1917 to 1918. Buck was built as a civilian motorboat in 1911. On 24 August 1917, the U.S. Navy acquired her under a free lease from th ...

                                               

Dreadnought

A dreadnought is a navy battleship. A battleship is a large ship used in ocean battles between countries. The first dreadnoughts were made in the early 20th century. They were named after HMS Dreadnought, of the Royal Navy, the first ship of that ...

                                               

Frigate

A frigate is a warship. The term has been used for warships of many sizes and roles for a few centuries. During the age of sail they were small, agile ships that were extensively used in the American War of Independence, and later against the Bri ...

                                               

INS Dakar

The INS Dakar was a submarine of the Israeli Navy. It disappeared in the Mediterranean Sea in 1968. It had formerly belonged to the Royal Navy as the HMS Totem. After sea trials it departed Scotland in January 1968 for Israel. She never arrived a ...

                                               

Ironclad warship

An ironclad is a ship protected by iron or steel armor plates. The first recorded use of an ironclad was during the Japanese invasion of Korea. Western use of ironclads began about the second half of the 19th century. The Western ironclad was dev ...

                                               

Japanese battleship Musashi

Musashi, named after the former Japanese province, was one of three Yamato -class battleships{{#tag:ref|Four ships were begun, but only two were completed as battleships. The third, Shinano, was completed as an aircraft carrier and the fourth was ...

                                               

Minesweeper

For the videogame, see Minesweeper video game A minesweeper is a small naval warship designed to sweep the water clear of mines. Minesweepers keep waterways clear for shipping. They are quieter and less magnetic than other ships, so the mines won ...

                                               

SMS Helgoland

style="width: 315px; border-spacing: 2px; margin-bottom: 10px;" SMS Helgoland, the lead ship of her class, was a dreadnought battleship of the German Imperial Navy. Helgoland s design was an improvement on the earlier Nassau class. One change was ...

                                               

SMS Posen

SMS Posen was a German battleship built in 1907 and launched in 1910. She had twelve 11 inch guns in six turrets. The ship sailed during most of the First World War, in the North Sea. The main battle she was in was the Battle of Jutland where she ...

                                               

Submarine

A submarine is a vessel that goes underwater. Most large submarines are war vessels. Some small ones are used for scientific or business purposes. These are often called "submersibles" and cannot go far or stay long away from base. Some people bu ...

                                               

Trireme

A Trireme is an ancient oar-driven warship powered by about 170 oars men. It was long and slender, had three tiers of oars and one sail. On the bow was a battering ram that was used to destroy enemy ships. The tip of the ram was made of bronze an ...

                                               

Turtle ship

Turtle ship is a warship built by Admiral Yi Sun-sin during a Japanese invasion of Korea in 16th century, Joseon Dynasty, and used to defeat the Japanese Navy. Because it looked like a turtle, it has been called Turtle ship."

                                               

U-boat

A U-boat is a military submarine used by Germany. German submarines were most active in the First Battle of the Atlantic in World War I and in World War II. Although they could be very effective as weapons against enemy warships, they were most e ...

                                               

Vasa (ship)

Vasa was a big Swedish warship. The ship was built from 1626 to 1628. The same year Vasa was ready outside Stockholm, but sank by accident on her maiden voyage. Vasa sank because she was too heavy on top. Those who built her knew that she had pro ...

                                               

Agriculture in Azerbaijan

Agriculture is an important part of the economy of Azerbaijan. It contributes only 6% of the GDP of the country, but employs 38.3% of the workforce. 21.78% of the total land area is arable land) and 2.1% are used for permanent crops. 16.45% of th ...

                                               

Agriculture in Pakistan

Pakistan s principal natural resources are arable land and water. About 25% of Pakistans total land area is under cultivation and is watered by one of the largest irrigation systems in the world. Pakistan irrigates three times more acres than Rus ...

                                               

Granary

A granary is a building or room that holds grain. It keeps the grain dry so it does not spoil, and keeps it away from animals that would eat it. They are an important part of a farm. If the grain is lost, eaten by pests, or ruined, the farmers mi ...

                                               

Greenhouse

A greenhouse is a building where plants such as flowers and vegetables are grown. It usually has a glass or translucent plastic roof. Many greenhouses also have glass or plastic walls. Greenhouses warm up during the day via penetration of the sun ...

                                               

Silo

A silo is a building that holds silage. Silage is green chopped plants that is kept wet. It ferments and can be kept all winter. It makes good food for livestock, particularly dairy cows.

                                               

Farmer

A farmer is a person who grows crops and raises animals to be used as food. This has been a common job for people since the beginning of civilization.

                                               

Gamekeeper

A gamekeeper is a person who manages an area of countryside to make sure there is enough game for shooting, or fish for angling. He actively manages areas of woodland, moorland, waterway or farmland for the benefit of game birds, deer, fish and w ...

                                               

Shepherd

A shepherd is someone who looks after sheep. Shepherds usually take the sheep out into fields so that they can graze. In the same way, someone who looks after cows is called a" cowherd”. A "swineherd" looks after pigs and a "goatherd" looks after ...

                                               

Stockman

In Australia, a stockman is the name given to a person who looks after the livestock on large farms known as a station. Stations are owned by a grazier or a grazing company. A stockman can also be the persons employed at abattoirs, feedlots, on l ...

                                               

Aphid

Aphids are small bugs which feed on plants. Aphids cause more plant damage than any other insects. There are over 4.000 different species of aphid. About 250 species are serious pests for agriculture and forestry as well as an annoyance for garde ...

                                               

Click beetle

Click beetle is the common name for beetles in the family Elateridae. They are also called elaters, snapping beetles, spring beetles or skipjacks. These beetles can be found almost anywhere on Earth. They have the unusual ability to flick themsel ...

                                               

Colorado potato beetle

The Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, is a beetle. It is sometimes just called the Colorado beetle. It is one of the worst potato pests in the world. The beetle is notable for its ability to resist pesticides. Over the last 50 ye ...

                                               

Khapra beetle

The Khapra beetle, which originated in South Asia, is one of the world’s most destructive pests of grain products and seeds. It is considered one of the 100 worst invasive species in the world. Infestations are difficult to control because of the ...