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COVID-19 pandemic in Switzerland

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have spread to Switzerland on 25 February 2020 when the first case of COVID-19 was confirmed following a COVID-19 outbreak in Italy.

                                               

February 2018 Israel–Syria incident

In February 10, 2018 an Israeli F-16 airplane was shot down by the Syrian Air defense force near the border between Syrian and Israel. Two pilots were injured. Two hours later, the Israeli force attacked Syria. Ever since the Iranian revolution 1 ...

                                               

Palmyra

Palmyra was an ancient Arabian city in central Syria. It is in an oasis 215 kilometres northeast of Damascus, and 180 km southwest of the Euphrates.

                                               

History of Taiwan

Taiwan is an island of eastern Asia. Its first people were related to Oceanic people with small numbers of Chinese. After the arrival of the Dutch in the 1600s, many Chinese moved to Taiwan to work. Few European people moved to Taiwan, and the na ...

                                               

First Sino-Japanese War

The First Sino-Japanese War was a war between the Qing Dynasty and the Empire of Japan. Finally, the Empire of Japan won the war. They signed the Treaty of Shimonoseki in 1895.

                                               

Fort Provintia

In 1624, the Dutch colonized southern Taiwan in order to trade with mainland China. Before the fort was built, the place was a center of commercial trade. The fort was built by the Dutch to prevent another rebellion after the local people, led by ...

                                               

Kingdom of Tungning

The Kingdom of Tungning was the first Han Chinese government to rule Taiwan. It ruled between 1661 and 1683. It was a pro-Ming Dynasty kingdom. It was started by Koxinga, after the destruction of Ming government by the Manchu. Koxinga was son of ...

                                               

Republic of Taiwan (1895)

The Republic of Taiwan was a short-lived republic on the island of Taiwan. It is also called in simplified Chinese: 台湾民主国 ; traditional Chinese: 臺灣民主國 ; pinyin: Taiwān Minzhǔguo ; which means "Democratic State of Taiwan". In English it ...

                                               

Siege of Fort Zeelandia

The Siege of Fort Zeelandia is the name for Koxingas Invasion of Taiwan. The siege started in 1661 and ended in 1662. It ended the Dutch East India Companys rule over Taiwan. After the siege, the Kingdom of Tungning ruled over the island. This ev ...

                                               

Constantinople Conference

The 1876–1877 Constantinople Conference of the Great Powers was held in Istanbul from 23 December 1876 until 20 January 1877. Following the Herzegovinian Rebellion started in 1875 and the Bulgarian Uprising in April 1876, the Great Powers agreed ...

                                               

Istanbul pogrom

The Istanbul Pogrom was a pogrom directed primarily against the Istanbuls Greek minority on September 6 and 7, 1955. Jews and Armenians living in the city and their businesses were also targeted in the pogrom, which was, according to some circles ...

                                               

Ottoman Interregnum

The Ottoman Interregnum, also known as The Ottoman Civil War, was a State of Interregnum In the Ottoman Empire lasting from 1402 to 1413. Four Brothers Mehmed, Isa, Musa and Suleiman Fought each other For the Throne The Civil war Began In 1402 wh ...

                                               

History of the United Kingdom

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a sovereign state. England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are parts of this state. The Acts of Union in 1707 united the crowns and Parliaments of England and Scotland to create th ...

                                               

Antonine Wall

The Antonine Wall is a stone and turf fortification built by the Romans across the Midlands of Scotland, between the Firth of Forth and the Firth of Clyde. The Antonine Wall is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site called Frontiers of the Roman ...

                                               

Britons (Celtic people)

The Britons were the people who spoke a Celtic language known as Common Brittonic. They lived in Great Britain during the Iron Age, Roman Britain and the Sub-Roman period following the Romans departure from Britain. Following the arrival of the A ...

                                               

Common Brittonic

Common Brittonic was an ancient language spoken in Britain. It was the language of the Celtic people known as the Britons. By the 6th century it split into several Brittonic languages: Welsh, Cumbric, Cornish, and Breton. Common Brittonic is desc ...

                                               

Commonwealth realm

A Commonwealth realm is a country in the Commonwealth of Nations which has Queen Elizabeth II as monarch. It includes her home country of the United Kingdom and many of its former colonies or territories, including: Bahamas Jamaica Antigua and Ba ...

                                               

Hadrians Wall

Hadrians Wall is a stone and turf fortification built by the Roman Empire in northern England to stop attacks by Scottish tribes. There were three legions working on it and in 10 years it was nearly finished. It was made a UNESCO World Heritage S ...

                                               

Kings shilling

The Kings shilling was the name given to a shilling that was given to soldiers who joined the British Army and the Royal Navy as a reward for enlisting. The word is often used when talking about the 17th and 18th centuries, but the word has been ...

                                               

Mutiny on the Bounty

The Mutiny on the Bounty has become a famous story, leading to many books, movies, and songs. The HMS Bounty was a small, three masted, fully rigged, sailing ship. The Bounty became famous when the crew mutinied the ship on 28 April 1789. The cap ...

                                               

Victorian era

The Victorian era of the United Kingdom was a time of Queen Victorias rule from 1837 to 1901. This time was very prosperous for the British people. Trade was at its best. A well educated middle class ruled the country and the British Empire. Othe ...

                                               

Workhouse

The workhouse was a place which offered housing and work to people who did not have any. They began in England and Wales during the 17th century. The first use of the word workhouse was in a report by the mayor of Abingdon in 1631 AD on the build ...

                                               

Admission to the Union

The Admission to the Union Clause is a part of the United States Constitution. It lets Congress add new states to the United States. There were thirteen states when the Constitution came into effect. 37 new states have since been added to the Uni ...

                                               

American imperialism

American imperialism is the economic, military, and cultural influence of the United States on other countries. At one time this influence included expansion into foreign territories. Expansionism was a primary objective of most empires, an examp ...

                                               

Anti-Federalist papers

The Anti-Federalist papers is the name given to a number of essays, which some of the Founding Fathers of the United States wrote. The writers were opposed to the idea of a Constitution for the United States. These papers were written in the 1790 ...

                                               

Curse of Tippecanoe

The name Curse of Tippecanoe is used to describe the death of Presidents of the United States in office while elected or re-elected in a year ending in "0". The "curse" began when President William Henry Harrison elected in 1840 died in office fr ...

                                               

Historical rankings of presidents of the United States

Historians are surveyed and asked to give Presidents of the United States number ratings on their overall performance or on different aspects of their leadership. Several different factors are considered in deciding what makes one a good or bad p ...

                                               

History of the United States (1789–1849)

The History of the United States, sometimes called the Antebellum period, is the history beginning with the Presidency of George Washington and ending just before the American Civil War. The first government, formed under the Articles of Confeder ...

                                               

Juneteenth

Juneteenth is a holiday in the United States on June 19. It is a memory of June 19, 1865, when the slaves in Texas got their freedom and commemorates the end of slavery in the United States. The name Juneteenth is a short form of June nineteenth. ...

                                               

Knights of Labor

The Knights of Labor was the largest and one of the most important American labor organizations of the 1880s. One of its first leaders was Terence V. Powderly. The Knights started as a secret society with many elaborate rituals. By 1878 they beca ...

                                               

Lynching in the United States

Lynching is murder, usually by hanging, used by a group of people as a form of punishment. In the United States, lynchings rose in number after the American Civil War in the early-to-mid 1860s. Although lynchings went down in the 1920s, they have ...

                                               

Manifest destiny

Manifest Destiny was the concept that the United States had a God-given right to claim territory across North America. The phrase "Manifest Destiny" was created in 1845 by a newspaper writer named John L. OSullivan. Quickly, the idea became very ...

                                               

Mass surveillance in the United States

The practice of mass surveillance in the United States dates back to wartime monitoring and censorship of international communications from, to, or which passed through the United States. After the First World War and the Second World War, the su ...

                                               

Naval History & Heritage Command

The Naval History & Heritage Command is at the historic Washington Navy Yard. It is an Echelon II command responsible for the preservation, analysis, and dissemination of U.S. naval history and heritage. The NHHC is composed of 42 facilities in 1 ...

                                               

New England Emigrant Aid Company

The New England Emigrant Aid Company, originally the Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company, was a transportation company in Boston, Massachusetts. It was created to bring immigrants to the Kansas Territory. This was done to make sure Kansas would be ...

                                               

Party realignment in the United States

A party realignment in the United States is when the country transitions from being mostly run by one political party to mostly run by another political party. During party realignments, some groups of people who used to vote for one party vote f ...

                                               

Pawnee people

The Pawnee are a Native American Plains Indians tribe. They lived mainly in what is now Nebraska and Kansas. Unlike other tribes of the Great Plains, they were semi-nomadic people. They were hunters and farmers. The Pawnee farmed for most of the ...

                                               

Progressive Era

The Progressive Era lasted from 1897 to 1920 in the United States. Its politics consisted of several ideals. These were that the government should control the private sector and that the American People should settle for nothing less then perfect ...

                                               

Slave states and free states

In the history of the United States of America, a slave state was a U.S. state in which the practice of slavery was legal at a particular point in time. A free state was one in which slavery was prohibited. Slavery was an issue that divided the c ...

                                               

Thirteen Colonies

The Thirteen Colonies were colonies in British North America in what is now the Eastern Seaboard of the United States. They were founded for different reasons. Some people thought that they would make a lot of money in new goods in America that c ...

                                               

Three-Fifths Compromise

In 1878, the US constitutional convention looked at the problem of counting its population. The population of a state determines the influence a state can take in a presidential election. The convention also looked at the problem of counting slav ...

                                               

List of U.S. states by date of admission to the Union

Below is a list of all 50 states in the order they joined the Union. The first 13 became states in July 1776 when they agreed to the United States Declaration of Independence. Each of those 13 agreed to the first U.S. constitution, called the Art ...

                                               

United States presidential doctrines

The first and most important presidential doctrine was the Monroe Doctrine by President James Monroe stated that the United States declared the right to have influence over Latin America and the U.S. threatened war to any European country which i ...

                                               

United States Revenue Cutter Service

The United States Revenue Cutter Service was set up in 1790 when President George Washington signed an act allowing the building of 10 boats. They were designed to collect customs duties and taxes and to protect against smuggling. They were also ...

                                               

USRC Active (1791)

USRC Active was one of the original ten cutters built and used by the United States Revenue Cutter Service. It was commissioned in 1792 and remained in service until 1800.

                                               

USRC Argus (1791)

USRC Argus was one of the original ten cutters built and used by the United States Revenue Cutter Service. Of the first ten cutters, the Argus was in service the longest.

                                               

USRC General Green (1791)

USRC General Green was one of the original ten cutters built and used by the United States Revenue Cutter Service. Although misspelled, she was named for the Revolutionary War hero Major General Nathanael Greene.

                                               

USRC Massachusetts (1791)

USRC Massachusetts was one of the original ten cutters built and used by the United States Revenue Cutter Service. While not the first USRS cutter to be launched, it was the first to enter active service.

                                               

USRC Scammel (1791)

Scammel was one of the original ten cutters built and used by the United States Revenue Cutter Service. The Schammel was named by Secretary of the Treasury, Alexander Hamilton, after the American Revolutionary War Adjutant general of the army, Al ...

                                               

USRC Vigilant (1791)

Vigilant was one of the original ten cutters built and used by the United States Revenue Cutter Service. Her name meant: On the alert; watchful. Vigilant was launched in 1791 in New York and was used to patrol New York waters.

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Pino - logical board game which is based on tactics and strategy. In general this is a remix of chess, checkers and corners. The game develops imagination, concentration, teaches how to solve tasks, plan their own actions and of course to think logically. It does not matter how much pieces you have, the main thing is how they are placement!

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