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Cretan hieroglyphs

Cretan heiroglyphs is a writing system, used in Crete from about the 20th to the 15th century BC. It is undeciphered, so it cannot be read today. For most of its history, it was used together with Linear A. Most symbols are pictograms, for some s ...

                                               

Linear A

Linear A is an ancient script used on Crete. No one has been able to translate this script yet. It was one of the writing systems used in Minoan Crete. Another script, about a century older, is called Cretan hieroglyphs. For some time, both metho ...

                                               

Minoan civilization

The Minoan civilization was a civilization on Crete called after Minos. It began in the Bronze Age between 3000 and 2700 BC. It lasted until about 1450 BC. The Minoan civilization is famous for its sea trading and well-planned cities. The Minoans ...

                                               

Phaistos disc

The Phaistos disc is a bronze age artifact. The disc is about 15 centimetres in diameter and is made of clay. It is covered with many symbols. It is from the civilization of Minoa on the Greek island of Crete, possibly from the 2nd millennium BC. ...

                                               

Anatolian hypothesis

The Anatolian hypothesis of Proto-Indo-European origin is that the speakers of the Proto-Indo-European language lived in Anatolia during the Neolithic era. When the Neolithic Revolution took place in the seventh and sixth millennia BC, the speake ...

                                               

Kurgan hypothesis

The Kurgan model of Indo-European origins is about both the people and their Proto-Indo-European language. It uses both archaeology and linguistics to show the history of their culture at different stages of the Indo-European expansion. The Kurga ...

                                               

Lake Mungo remains

The Lake Mungo remains are three sets of human fossils. They are Lake Mungo 1, Lake Mungo 2, and Lake Mungo 3. The sites are located near Lake Mungo, in New South Wales, Australia, in the World Heritage-listed Willandra Lakes Region. Pieces of sk ...

                                               

Urheimat

Urheimat is a linguistic term meaning the original homeland of the speakers of a proto-language. Since many peoples tend to wander and spread, there is no exact Urheimat, but there is an Indo-European Urheimat different from the Germanic or Roman ...

                                               

Homo erectus

Homo erectus is an extinct species of the genus Homo. Fossil remains were found in Java and in China. Nearly all of them were lost during World War II, but there are casts that are considered to be reliable evidence. Early in the 20th century it ...

                                               

Homo ergaster

Homo ergaster, also called "African Homo erectus ", is an extinct chronospecies of Homo which lived in eastern and southern Africa during the early Pleistocene, between 1.8 million and 1.3 million years ago. There is still disagreement on the sub ...

                                               

Homo habilis

Homo habilis is one of the early ancestors of modern man who used primitive stone tools. Their remains have been found in the Olduvai Gorge in Tanzania. They are believed to be about 2 million years old. The flat face and large molars of the Homo ...

                                               

Homo naledi

Homo naledi is a species of archaic human found in the Rising Star Cave, Cradle of Humankind, South Africa. The species possibly lived in the Middle Pleistocene 335.000–236.000 years ago. The initial discovery comprises 1.550 specimens, represent ...

                                               

Homo sapiens idaltu

Homo sapiens idaltu is an extinct subspecies of Homo sapiens. They lived almost 160.000 years ago in Africa during the Pleistocene period. Idaltu is the Afar word for "elder, first born". The fossilized remains of H. s. idaltu were discovered in ...

                                               

Koobi Fora

Koobi Fora is a region around Koobi Fora Ridge, on the eastern shore of Lake Turkana, Kenya. It is in the territory of the nomadic Gabbra people. The term East Turkana can be used for the whole area. The ridge is an outcrop of mainly Pliocene/Ple ...

                                               

Laetoli

Laetoli is a site in Tanzania, dated to the Plio–Pleistocene. It is famous for its hominin footprints, preserved in volcanic ash. The site of the Laetoli footprints is 45 km south of Olduvai gorge. It was excavated by archaeologists Louis and Mar ...

                                               

Sahelanthropus

Sahelanthropus tchadensis is a fossil hominid. From evidence at the fossil site in Chad in the African Sahel, it is thought to have lived about 7 million years ago. The split of the line into humans and chimpanzees known as human-chimpanzee diver ...

                                               

Taung Child

The Taung Child is a fossil of a skull. The skull also has an imprint of the brain. It belongs to an Australopithecus africanus. It was discovered in 1924 by a quarryman working for the Northern Lime Company in Taung, South Africa. Raymond Dart, ...

                                               

Bryn Celli Ddu

Bryn Celli Ddu is a prehistoric site on the Welsh island of Anglesey near Llanddaniel Fab. Its name means the mound in the dark grove. It was robbed in 1699 and archaeologically dug between 1928 and 1929. During the Neolithic period a stone circl ...

                                               

Carnac stones

The Carnac stones are the largest collection of megalithic standing stones in the world. The more than 3.000 prehistoric standing stones were cut from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The stones were erected at some st ...

                                               

Heart of Neolithic Orkney

Heart of Neolithic Orkney refers to a group of Neolithic monuments found on Mainland, one of the islands of Orkney, Scotland. The name was adopted by UNESCO when it proclaimed these sites as a World Heritage Site in 1999. There are five sites on ...

                                               

Maeshowe

Maeshowe, also known as Orkhaugr, a burial mound in Orkney, Scotland, with underground passage graves. It was built during the Neolithic period, about 3000 years ago. It has been included in the World Heritage Site, Heart of Neolithic Orkney. The ...

                                               

Megalith

A megalith is a large stone used to build a structure or monument, either alone or together with other stones. Megalithic means structures made of such large stones, put together without the use of mortar or cement. The word megalith comes from t ...

                                               

Nabta Playa

Nabta Playa was once a large basin in the Nubian Desert. It is about 500 miles south of modern-day Cairo or about 100 kilometers west of Abu Simbel of southern Egypt, 22° 32 north, 30° 42 east. Many archaeological sites have been found there.

                                               

Neolithic British Isles

The Neolithic British Isles is about the remains of tribes living in the islands from about 4000 BC to 2.500 BC. These people left stone monuments and other remains in Great Britain, Ireland, the Isle of Man and many other islands. p37 The Neolit ...

                                               

Pentre Ifan

The Pentre Ifan dolmen is the largest and best preserved neolithic dolmen in Wales. It is on the ancient manor of Pentre Ifan in the civil parish of Nevern, Pembrokeshire, Wales. The manor was the home of the Bowen family going back to the 11th c ...

                                               

Ring of Brodgar

The Ring of Brodgar is a Neolithic henge and stone circle on Mainland, the largest island in Orkney, Scotland. It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site known as the Heart of Neolithic Orkney. The stone circle is 104 metres 341 ft in diameter, ...

                                               

Standing stone

Standing stones or menhirs are stones set into the ground vertically. They were put there by Neolithic people in the British Isles and Brittany, and they also occur elsewhere in the world. There may be single standing stones, circles, lines or gr ...

                                               

Wonders of the World

The Seven Wonders of the World is a widely-known list of seven great buildings or structures from the classical time period.

                                               

Colossus of Rhodes

The Colossus of Rhodes was a huge iron and bronze statue of the Greek god Helios. It was built on the Greek island of Rhodes. It was built by Chares of Lindos, a student of Lysippos. It was built between 294 and 282 BC. It was one of the Seven Wo ...

                                               

Giza Necropolis

Giza Necropolis is on the Giza Plateau near the city of Cairo, Egypt. It is about 8 kilometres inland into the desert from the ancient town of Giza on the Nile, and about 25 kilometres southwest of Cairo city centre. The Great Pyramid is the only ...

                                               

Lighthouse of Alexandria

The Lighthouse of Alexandria, or the Pharos, was a tall tower built between 285 and 247 BCE. It was built on the island of Pharos in Alexandria, Egypt to serve as a lighthouse for sailors. The top of the tower had a mirror that reflected sunlight ...

                                               

Mausoleum at Halicarnassus

The Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, or Tomb of Mausolus, was a tomb built between 353 and 350 BC at Halicarnassus. It was built for Mausolus, a satrap in the Persian Empire, and Artemisia II of Caria, who was both his wife and his sister. The buildin ...

                                               

Temple of Artemis

The Temple of Artemis, also known as the Artemision, was a temple dedicated to the goddess Artemis. It was completed around 350 BC at Ephesus under the Achaemenid dynasty of the Persian Empire. Only ruins of the temple remain. It was one of the S ...

                                               

Statue of Zeus at Olympia

The Statue of Zeus at Olympia, Greece was designed by Phidias about 432 BC. Phidias built his workshop at Olympia to construct this statue and probably stayed there the rest of his life. The statue was housed in the Temple of Zeus. With the base, ...

                                               

Norman Tindale

Norman Barnett Tindale AO was an Australian anthropologist, archaeologist and ethnologist. He worked for the South Australian Museum for almost 50 years. He is best known for his work mapping the various cultural groupings of Indigenous Australia ...

                                               

Archaeological site

An archaeological site is a place where physical remains of the past survive. The archaeologists working there will carefully record what they find. They may also change the site so that what has been found can be preserved better. The site will ...

                                               

Afar Triangle

The Afar Triangle is a low area bordering on the Red Sea. It is part of the Great Rift Valley in East Africa. The area overlaps the borders of Eritrea, Djibouti and the entire Afar region of Ethiopia.

                                               

Ancient monument

The term ancient monument is a term in British law. It is an early historical structure or monument. For example. it may be an archaeological site worth preserving and study. The sites are of archaeological or heritage interest. The term differs ...

                                               

Bassetki

In 1975 a fragment of a figure of Naram-Sin of Akkad was found near Bassetki. The statue is now called the Bassetki Statue. In August–October 2016, the Institute for Ancient Near Eastern Studies from the University of Tubingen and Hasan Qasim fro ...

                                               

Chauvet Cave

The Chauvet Cave or Chauvet-Pont-dArc Cave is near Vallon-Pont-dArc, in the Ardeche departement, in southern France. It became famous in 1994 when Paleolithic artwork was found on the walls. There were remains of many animals, some which are now ...

                                               

Complex of Koguryo tombs

The complex of Koguryo tombs or Goguryeo tombs is a group of tombs, or places where human bodies are buried, in North Korea. The tombs were built during the Kingdom of Koguryo, which ruled parts of China and Korea from the 37 b.c.e. to the 7th ce ...

                                               

Creevykeel Court Tomb

Creevykeel Court Tomb is a court tomb in Ireland. It is one of the best-preserved court tombs. It is in the foothills of Tievebaun Mountain, close to the sea near Mullaghmore in County Sligo.

                                               

Happisburgh archaeology

The small village of Happisburgh on the coast of Norfolk has evidence of the earliest modern man. The oldest hominin footprints in Europe are in Britain. They are about 800.000 years to a million years old. They were found on Happisburgh beach, E ...

                                               

Henge

A henge is a Neolithic earthwork. Henges are typical of the British Isles, but there are a few similar structures in continental Europe. Henges have a ring bank and ditch. They are not thought to be primarily defensive, because their ditch is ins ...

                                               

Historic Monuments and Sites in Kaesong

The historic monuments and sites in Kaesong are a group of archaeological sites in North Korea that show the history of the Koryo Dynasty, which ruled Korea from 918 c.e. to 1392 c.e. All together, they were named a UNESCO World Heritage Site in ...

                                               

List of Roman sites in Spain

Archaeological site of San Roque Lliberis Archaeological Ensemble of Acinipo Archaeological site of Santa Eulalia Archaeological site of Cercadilla Castro Bergidum Pol lentia Archaeological site of Cimadevilla Merida Archaeological site of lEsque ...

                                               

Llullaillaco

Llullaillaco is a 6.739 metres stratovolcano in the Andes range, in Argentina and Chile. It is the 7th highest mountain in the Andes. It lies in the Puna de Atacama, a region of very high volcanic peaks on a high plateau within the Atacama Desert ...

                                               

Oppidum

Oppidum is a Latin word for the main settlement in any administrative area of ancient Rome. The word comes from ob-pedum, an "enclosed space." This may in turn have come from the Proto-Indo-European word, *pedom-, meaning an "occupied space" or " ...

                                               

Rock art of the Iberian Mediterranean Basin

Rock art of the Iberian Mediterranean Basin, or Levantine art, is a group of over 750 prehistoric sites. They were declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1998. The sites are in the eastern part of Spain. They show rock art from the Upper Pal ...

                                               

Scheduled monument

In the United Kingdom, a scheduled monument is a nationally important archaeological site or historic building. The schedule legally protects the monument from unauthorised change. The protection of scheduled monuments is given under the Ancient ...

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